Drosera

Sundews

Both the botanical name (from the Greek δρόσος: drosos = "dew, dewdrops") and the English common name (sundew, derived from Latin ros solis, meaning "dew of the sun") refer to the glistening drops of mucilage at the tip of each tentacle that resemble drops of morning dew.

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The fact that a plant should secrete, when properly excited, a fluid containing an acid and ferment, closely analogous to the digestive fluid of an animal, was certainly a remarkable discovery.
— Darwin

Nepenthes

Monkey Cups

A plant growing about 3 feet high which carries at the end of its leaves a hollow flower or fruit resembling a small vase, with its own lid, a wonderful sight. After rain these flowers are full of water, each one containing a good half-glass. Pitcher-Plants of Borneo

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The carriers called them “monkey cups,” a name I had heard elsewhere in reference to Nepenthes, but the implication that monkeys drink the pitcher fluid seemed farfetched. I later proved it true.
— Paul A. Zahl

Sarracenia

Pitcher Plants

The plant attracts its insect prey with secretions from the lip of the pitcher leaves. Slippery footing at the pitcher's rim, aided in at least one species by a narcotic drug lacing the nectar, causes insects to fall inside, where they are digested by the plant.

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